Is childhood antibiotic use linked to obesity in later ages?

For the study, scientists will follow how many times children are prescribed antibiotics during the first two years of life, and then continue to track children to ages five and 10 to see how many of them are obese (i.e., heavier than 95 per cent of children of the same age and sex).
“We have biological and statistical data that suggest there may be a connection, but we are looking for answers that can help us better understand this relationship and guide clinical practice in a way that will truly reduce a child’s risk for becoming obese,” she said in a university statement.

As the obesity rate continues to skyrocket in the US, scientists across the country are combing the health records of 1.6 million kids to determine if childhood antibiotic use causes weight gain later in life.

“We know that childhood obesity is not only caused by genes, an unhealthy diet and too little activity, but likely the combination of several complex factors — one of which may be the frequent use of antibiotics at a young age,” said one of the researchers Ihuoma Eneli, Professor at Ohio State University, in the US. Full Story

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